04
Jul 2017

SATs success: our key stage two results have improved at almost three times the rate of other primary schools

Staff and pupils across the Creative Education Trust are celebrating as the number of key stage two pupils achieving expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics improved at almost three times the rate of other primary schools across the country.

The raw national data, published by the Department for Education showed the national average for pupils achieving expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics has improved by eight percentage points. In comparison, Creative Education Trust primary schools have improved by 21.4 percentage points.

Creative Education Trust was established in 2010 with the aim of providing a high quality education and opening up opportunities in post-industrial cities and coastal towns. It has built a reputation for transforming some of the most challenging schools in the country – and quickly. Two thirds of all Creative Education Trust schools are now rated good by Ofsted – having previously been in special measures before joining the trust.

Wroughton Academy in Great Yarmouth has seen its results increase by 25 percentage points, having joined Creative Education Trust just 8 months ago. 45% of pupils this year achieved expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics compared with 20% last year.

 

Percentage of pupils achieving expected reading, writing and mathematics levels
School 2016 results 2017 results Percentage point change
Creative Education Trust average 36.6% 57.8% +21.4
Harpfield Primary Academy (Stoke-on-Trent) 48% 56% +8
Queen Eleanor Primary Academy (Northampton) 47% 70% +23
Three Peaks Primary Academy (Tamworth) 40% 57% +17
Woodlands Primary Academy (Great Yarmouth) 27% 61% +34
Wroughton Primary Academy (Great Yarmouth) 20% 45% +25

 

Marc Jordan, Chief Executive of Creative Education Trust says:

“I am delighted at the significant improvements being made in every primary school across the Creative Education Trust – congratulations to all staff and pupils.

 We exist to make sure that every young person, regardless of their background, leaves our schools empowered with the knowledge, skills and creativity they need to succeed in life. We still have a way to go, however, today we are one step closer to achieving this.”